Question: Why Is The Treaty Of Waitangi Important In Early Childhood Education?

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori..

Why is it called the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of New Zealand. It is an agreement entered into by representatives of the Crown and of Māori iwi (tribes) and hapū (sub-tribes). It is named after the place in the Bay of Islands where the Treaty was first signed, on 6 February 1840.

What the Treaty of Waitangi means to me?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of our country. Maori agreed: to let other people live in their country; and. to let the British make rules about behaviour and see that everyone obeys them.

How do you honor the Treaty of Waitangi?

Honoring the Treaty can be as simple as supporting treaty education in schools, reading and improving knowledge of nz history, learning te reo or simply making a genuine attempt to say māori names correctly.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What are the objectives of early childhood care and education?

Early childhood care and education (ECCE) is more than preparation for primary school. It aims at the holistic development of a child’s social, emotional, cognitive and physical needs in order to build a solid and broad foundation for lifelong learning and wellbeing.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English. One version of the Treaty was written in Māori and one in English and these two versions of the Treaty can be interpreted to mean different things.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

What does HAPU mean?

In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.

Why were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

Treaty principles developed by the Crown iwi have the right to organise as iwi, and, under the law, to control their resources as their own. all New Zealanders are equal before the law. both the government and iwi are obliged to accord each other reasonable cooperation on major issues of common concern.

Why is Te Reo important in early childhood?

Teaching and learning te reo Māori is important because it relates to the bicultural framing of Te Whāriki and the vision that all children will grow up strong in their identity, language and culture. … “We want our children to know that it’s really important for them to know about their heritage.”

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.